MARGARET MEETS: CHARLIE BRINKHURST-CUFF

14.12.18

MARGARET MEETS: CHARLIE BRINKHURST-CUFF     This month, Margaret met with Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff when she took part in our Margaret Morning panel discussion on all things Generation Z. Charlie is a news and features writer, editor and creative with focuses on race, feminism, media, youth culture and social politics. Charlie is the deputy editor at […]

MARGARET MEETS: CHARLIE BRINKHURST-CUFF

 

 

This month, Margaret met with Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff when she took part in our Margaret Morning panel discussion on all things Generation Z. Charlie is a news and features writer, editor and creative with focuses on race, feminism, media, youth culture and social politics.

Charlie is the deputy editor at gal-dem, a writer and editor for Dazed & Dazed Beauty, a columnist at the i newspaper and a Guardian freelancer. She’s had a pretty amazing year and has just released a book, Mother Country: Real Stories of the Windrush Children, a leading new exploration of the Windrush generation featuring David Lammy, Lenny Henry, Corinne Bailey Rae, Sharmaine Lovegrove, Hannah Lowe, Jamz Supernova, Natasha Gordon and Rikki Beadle-Blair. Go Charlie!

Let’s start off with your favourite Margaret from history (we’re sure you have a multitude, but pick that special one).

Anyone but Margaret Thatcher.  I had a great nursery teacher called Margaret.

Can you tell those who may not know, who are you and what do you do?

I’m a journalist, editor and (recently) author writing about race, feminism, immigration, social justice, media and diversity for a range of outlets and publications. My identity at the moment is bound up in the work I do for gal-dem, a publication championing women of colour and non-binary people of colour, and my work around the Windrush generation.

When did you start doing what you do?

In uni I started down the path of my journalism career, but I have written stories and diaries forever.

What made you want to do it?

An urge to tell stories, an urge to tell my own story and a sense that there are injustices in the world that can only be resolved with communication.

Any words of wisdom for those looking to follow in your footsteps?

Answer your emails and push through the fear. I’m naturally shy but I’ve taught myself to speak to all kinds of people.

How have your skills evolved since starting?

Imposter syndrome means it’s a struggle to recognise evolution but I will say that I think I am better at identifying stories that will speak to my community than I was.

What was your earliest ambition?

To be a dancer or a writer – but I wouldn’t call myself an ambitious person.

What has been your greatest achievement, and greatest disappointment?

I’m very proud of all the work we do at gal-dem. Disappointment isn’t all that helpful. I take most things with a pinch of salt.

What is your guiltiest pleasure?

I don’t have any! As long as my pleasures don’t actively harm people – which I don’t believe they generally do – I wouldn’t feel guilty about them.

Anything or anyone that we should watch out for? (e.g. in music, fashion, a writer etc)

Watch out for gal-dem. We’ve only just started.

Name a couple of tracks that we should feature on one of our Margaret newsletter playlists.

NAO – Curiousity

Otis Redding – Sitting on the Dock of the Bay

Jimmy Ruffin – What Becomes of the Brokenhearted

3 things that we don’t know about you:

– I’m an expert at making chocolate fondant cakes
– I love cat memes, and cats in general
– I cut my relaxed hair off this year!

Return to Journal